15 Mar

How to Diversify Your KidLit-Related Lists #kidlitwomen

Often, those of us involved in children’s or young adult literature make lists without realizing that we’re making lists.

Four panelists that you’re considering for a session proposal for an upcoming conference? That’s a list.

Books selected for display face-out on a library or bookstore shelf? Also a list.

Authors or illustrators selected one by one for a recurring feature on your blog or in your newsletter? It may come together gradually, but over time, that’s a list, too.

Whether you’re creating a list of your own or thinking about sharing one that somebody else made, you’ve got an opportunity to better reflect the diversity that exists among the readers of children’s and YA books.

But how, exactly?

For my contribution to the March 2018 conversation on #kidlitwomen (join on Facebook,and Twitter), I’m happy to offer this downloadable guide, How to Diversify Your KidLit-Related Lists.

It’s an updated version of a graphic I’ve previously posted here. This new version has been edited by Karen Blumenthal, redesigned by Janie Bynum, and considerably improved by their efforts.

We hope you will share it widely (don’t forget the #kidlitwomen hashtag) and refer to it often (wouldn’t a color print look great on a wall in your office?). And, of course, we welcome your feedback in the comments below.