08 Jan

“How do you get the information for all your nonfiction books?”

At a recent school visit, a student asked about my research process for my nonfiction books such as Whoosh! and Dazzle Ships: Where do I get all that information from?

There’s a lot to say about that, but here’s how I often get started.

04 Sep

When boxes of bookmarks arrive, it must be school-visit season again

Lo and behold, look what showed up on Friday:

Just in time for the start of this year’s school visits, it was our first shipment of our newest two-sided, hers-and-his bookmarks, and I think they’re beautiful.

Jennifer and I will leave these bookmarks for the audiences at each campus where we give presentations, though some lucky students will receive bookmarks from before the publication of Jennifer’s Revenge of the Teacher’s Pets (this past June) and my own What Do You Do with a Voice Like That? (coming three weeks from today).

But those aren’t leftovers — they’re vintage!

22 May

Sign up now for my summer online classes about school visits


Registration is now open for two webinars I’m teaching this July on the topic of school visits. If you know an author or illustrator who might benefit, won’t you please share this with them?

School-Visit Basics with author Chris Barton
Monday, July 16, 2018, 7 p.m. Central
In this 90-minute webinar geared toward authors and illustrators doing from one to ten school visits (mostly local) per year, Chris Barton shares his insights about setting rates, getting bookings, making effective presentations, managing details, and providing the best possible experience for everyone involved. If you’re relatively new to doing school visits and want to get up to speed, or have limited availability that you want to make the most of, bring your questions and get them answered by someone who has made the transition from total newbie to 100-visits-per-year veteran.
Register for the basic class through the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. (SCBWI members receive a discounted rate of just $10.)

School-Visit Advanced with author Chris Barton
Wednesday, July 18, 2018, 7 p.m. Central
In this 120-minute webinar geared toward authors and illustrators doing more than ten school visits (or more than five out-of-town visits) per year, author Chris Barton shares his insights about managing your calendar, working with (and without) a booking agent, finding and communicating with interested schools, coordinating with your hosts, improving your presentations, traveling smartly and healthily, and dealing with glitches, snags, and setbacks — all while tending to your creative work and enjoying your career. If you’re experienced at school visits and want more — more bookings than you’ve been getting, or more satisfaction with the number of visits you’re doing now — bring your questions and get them answered by someone who visits more than 100 schools per year and pretty much loves it.
Register for the advanced class through the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. (SCBWI members receive a discounted rate of just $35.)

Thank you to the Austin chapter of SCBWI for making these online classes happen. I miss doing school visits during the summer, so as I prepare for the webinars, at least I’ll be thinking about doing school visits!

26 Apr

Upon closer inspection

This was one of several thank-you cards I received from students at a school in Maryland last week.

It contains one of my favorite elements that I sometimes see in such cards: a depiction of the author himself!

Really, just look at this:

I mean, seriously:

One of these is by photographer Sam Bond, but I’m not saying which one

But the best part? If you’ll look verrrrry closely at one of the eyes, you’ll see it looks just like a heart:

That’s certainly how I feel when I look out on an audience that’s excited about reading and writing and drawing and creating their own stories, but I never realized I was so obvious about it.

13 Feb

Authors are not rock stars

I want to talk about rock stars.

Schools often go to great lengths to get their students excited about an upcoming presentation by a visiting author. That makes sense to me — after whipping up that enthusiasm, educators can then harness it for thoughtful, mind-expanding explorations of that author’s work, and for all sorts of creative undertakings by the students themselves.

Sometimes, though, the anticipation-stoking tactics include the use of certain words or phrases that make me uncomfortable. I feel uneasy when I see them on a sign in front of a school or hear them as part of the introduction right before I start talking to the students. The main ones are:

Famous.

Celebrity.

Rock star. (Yes. As in, “He’s a rock star!”)

I’d guess that most creators of books for young readers aren’t even celebrities in their own neighborhoods, let alone the “world famous” types they sometimes get described as to impressionable students.

But even allowing for a little hyperbole, I’m bothered by these characterizations because they run counter to what I see as the main purpose of my presentations to students: 1) making myself relatable to them, and 2) making a career like mine seem attainable to them.

My introductory slide from my recent visit to Cambridge Elementary in San Antonio.

Right after my greeting to them, I go straight into listing several other things — many of which will be recognizable and familiar to audience members — that I am in addition to “Author.”

These include “Former Kid,” “Texan,” “Son,” “Brother,” “Dog Owner,” “Spanish Learner,” “Researcher,” and “Rewriter,” which I say three more times because I want them to understand the effort that goes into becoming a published author.

Over the course of my presentation I try to replace any air of mystique about my career with a sense of awareness of what this fun, challenging job entails and how happy this hard work makes me.

Then I leave them with my hope that when they’re grown they will find something they love just as much — not an easy job, not a job that brings them fame, and certainly not one that bestows “rock star” status — but rather a calling that suits them.

And not only a calling that suits them, but also one that they can fully participate in without unfair and unnecessary restrictions, distractions, or impediments.

Which brings us to the subject of sexual harassment in children’s publishing, a phrase that I never imagined would find its way onto Bartography when I started this blog nearly 13 years ago. That mostly just shows how privileged and naive I was.

Harassment isn’t new. But the attention it’s getting in this industry — “ecosystem” is more like it, with libraries and booksellers and conferences playing vital roles — is not just new but raw, painful, chaotic, long overdue, and rapidly developing.

As of this afternoon, the best overview I’ve seen of where things stand is this article published this morning by Publishers Weekly. Long story short, a number of men in children’s publishing — guys who I bet have heard themselves described as “rock stars” more than a few times — are being accused of unacceptable behavior. Names are being named.

But what does all of this have to do with you and the young people who look to you for books and guidance? Three things.

First, I believe that young readers will wind up with better books when the creative process and literary life aren’t sullied or ruined for so many by male misbehavior.

Second, as the children’s literature community succeeds in its efforts to become a more hospitable place, there will be fewer obstacles to success for student writers who get encouragement from authors such as me.

And third, the book I’d been preparing to feature in my giveaway in this month’s Bartography Express newsletter includes an essay by an author who, in recent days, has been named in allegations by several anonymous accusers. I do not doubt these women’s stories. But I decided to proceed as planned with the featured book, as even under the current circumstances I believe it offers much more cause for hope than for despair.

I’ll soon post my Q&A with the editor of the anthology featured in the February issue of Bartography Express.