15 Mar

My first-ever New York State school-visit trip

I did my first New York State school visits last week, outside Rochester, so the first thing I needed to do was head northeast. Here’s what that looked like:

All week long, I saw terrific examples of the preparation and investment of time and energy on the part of these schools — from kindergartners to administrators — as they made the most of the opportunity to have an author visit and talk with their students. The most evident sign was in the artwork I saw throughout the schools:

Also: It was supercold last week, at least by my Central Texas standards. We’re talking 10 degrees Fahrenheit at some points, and not all that much warmer until my last afternoon, when it got all the way up to 34. And the skies were blue, and I had some free time before catching my flight home.

My dilemma: Do I seek out the local Rochester delicacy known as the “garbage plate,” or do I commune a little with nature and history?

Well:

Yep. I opted for a walk through the Mount Hope Cemetery. I’ll just have to return to Rochester for that garbage plate.

24 Jan

A great day with My Favorite Author in the Whole Wide World


Yesterday was pretty terrific, because I got to spend it visiting schools with my wife — and, as it happens, My Favorite Author in the Whole Wide World — Jennifer Ziegler.

Even better, we were not presenting at the same time, so Jennifer and I got to watch each other at work. This was such a treat for me, y’all, because she is so good at what she does. Jennifer has a great rapport with kids —

— and is generous as can be about sharing her writing advice, messy/marked-up drafts, and egregious typos.

We spent the day at schools in the Houston area. “These are some of my books,” Jennifer told her audience. “They are all set in Texas, because when I was growing up, all the books I read were set in New York for some reason.”

Then she told them about the time a New York copyeditor marked on a manuscript, “Tacos are not a breakfast food.”

This being Texas, where breakfast tacos are indeed a thing, 500 sixth-graders gasped.

But, she assured them, she stood up for breakfast tacos, and that’s what the Brewster Triplets ate in Revenge of the Angels.

At that point, a cafeteria full of sixth-graders cheered for Jennifer Ziegler. And for breakfast tacos.

Just to prove that I did indeed do a presentation of my own, here are a few photos of me discussing my What Do You Do with a Voice Like That? The Story of Extraordinary Congresswoman Barbara Jordan.

But I like the pictures of Jennifer better — I could watch her talk to students all day, and I highly recommend that you give it a try.

08 Jan

“How do you get the information for all your nonfiction books?”

At a recent school visit, a student asked about my research process for my nonfiction books such as Whoosh! and Dazzle Ships: Where do I get all that information from?

There’s a lot to say about that, but here’s how I often get started.

04 Sep

When boxes of bookmarks arrive, it must be school-visit season again

Lo and behold, look what showed up on Friday:

Just in time for the start of this year’s school visits, it was our first shipment of our newest two-sided, hers-and-his bookmarks, and I think they’re beautiful.

Jennifer and I will leave these bookmarks for the audiences at each campus where we give presentations, though some lucky students will receive bookmarks from before the publication of Jennifer’s Revenge of the Teacher’s Pets (this past June) and my own What Do You Do with a Voice Like That? (coming three weeks from today).

But those aren’t leftovers — they’re vintage!

22 May

Sign up now for my summer online classes about school visits


Registration is now open for two webinars I’m teaching this July on the topic of school visits. If you know an author or illustrator who might benefit, won’t you please share this with them?

School-Visit Basics with author Chris Barton
Monday, July 16, 2018, 7 p.m. Central
In this 90-minute webinar geared toward authors and illustrators doing from one to ten school visits (mostly local) per year, Chris Barton shares his insights about setting rates, getting bookings, making effective presentations, managing details, and providing the best possible experience for everyone involved. If you’re relatively new to doing school visits and want to get up to speed, or have limited availability that you want to make the most of, bring your questions and get them answered by someone who has made the transition from total newbie to 100-visits-per-year veteran.
Register for the basic class through the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. (SCBWI members receive a discounted rate of just $10.)

School-Visit Advanced with author Chris Barton
Wednesday, July 18, 2018, 7 p.m. Central
In this 120-minute webinar geared toward authors and illustrators doing more than ten school visits (or more than five out-of-town visits) per year, author Chris Barton shares his insights about managing your calendar, working with (and without) a booking agent, finding and communicating with interested schools, coordinating with your hosts, improving your presentations, traveling smartly and healthily, and dealing with glitches, snags, and setbacks — all while tending to your creative work and enjoying your career. If you’re experienced at school visits and want more — more bookings than you’ve been getting, or more satisfaction with the number of visits you’re doing now — bring your questions and get them answered by someone who visits more than 100 schools per year and pretty much loves it.
Register for the advanced class through the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. (SCBWI members receive a discounted rate of just $35.)

Thank you to the Austin chapter of SCBWI for making these online classes happen. I miss doing school visits during the summer, so as I prepare for the webinars, at least I’ll be thinking about doing school visits!

26 Apr

Upon closer inspection

This was one of several thank-you cards I received from students at a school in Maryland last week.

It contains one of my favorite elements that I sometimes see in such cards: a depiction of the author himself!

Really, just look at this:

I mean, seriously:

One of these is by photographer Sam Bond, but I’m not saying which one

But the best part? If you’ll look verrrrry closely at one of the eyes, you’ll see it looks just like a heart:

That’s certainly how I feel when I look out on an audience that’s excited about reading and writing and drawing and creating their own stories, but I never realized I was so obvious about it.