18 Aug

Starred reviews and other good news for Dazzle Ships

I’ve already mentioned the coverage in Kirkus this review, and this interview — of Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion, written by me, illustrated by Victo Ngai, published by Millbrook Press, and available on September 1.

Now I’m happy as can be to point you toward what some of the other major review publications have had to say about the book.

Booklist calls the book “an inspiring story of creativity and adds:

Ngai’s swirling, art nouveau–style illustrations replicate some of the bold shapes and designs on the so-called “dazzle ships,” and the soft colors and stylized figures nicely soften the wartime theme and focus attention to the ships. Barton adds plenty of historical context, illuminating other naval defense schemes of the period, as well as the role of women in creating dazzle patterns.

Dazzle Ships received a starred review from Publishers Weekly, which said in part:

“Sometimes desperate times call for dazzling measures,” writes Barton in conclusion, underscoring the importance of creative problem solving. Reflective author and artist notes, a timeline with b&w photographs, and a reading list wrap up a conversational, compelling, and visually arresting story that coincides with the 100th anniversary of its subject.

And our book earned a second starred review, from School Library Journal:

The well-written, intriguing text is complemented by Ngai’s vibrant and surreal illustrations that skillfully recreate the glittering water and the striking camouflaged vessels. … With the commemoration of the centenary of World War I, this book is a fascinating selection that will captivate readers, especially war story enthusiasts.

I hope you’re intrigued enough to get the word out — and show up in person, if you can — for my September 7 reading, discussion, and signing of Dazzle Ships at Austin’s BookPeople.

17 Aug

My first extended conversation about Dazzle Ships*

*with someone not a) directly involved in its creation, or b) married to me

Julie Danielson recently interviewed me for Kirkus Reviews about my upcoming picture book Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion (Millbrook Press), illustrated by Victo Ngai. Here’s a taste:

Jules: So, what was it like for you to see Victo’s illustrations for the first time?

Chris: My reaction to the first cover sketch my editor shared was (and I have the email to prove it): “Oooooh!!!” And I was at least somewhat prepared for what Victo’s art in this book might look like, because I had seen samples of her work before she was selected as the illustrator. I knew it was going to be a visually fantastic book.

But even then, when I saw the first color art for Dazzle Ships — it was the two-page spread for “Britain, the United States, and their allies turned things around…” — my response was, “[H]oly moly, is that artwork astounding! I’m looking forward more than ever to seeing the rest.”

I had fun chatting with Julie, and I hope you’ll enjoy it, too.

If you like the sound of this book, here are a couple of dates to keep in mind:

September 1: Publication day! Buy Dazzle Ships from your most beloved independent bookseller.

September 7: If you’re in Austin, come hear me read and discuss Dazzle Ships that evening at my most beloved independent bookseller.

16 Jun

Good news from Kirkus — and from Kirkus!

Yesterday I went looking for the just-published Kirkus review of my next book, Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion, and to my surprise I also found a review of Book or Bell?, my other upcoming 2017 title.

To my delight, too, as both reviews have favorable things to say. Whew!

From the review of Book or Bell?:

[T]he text and artwork become silly to the point of laughter, as Henry’s refusal to leave his book causes a messy chain reaction… One elected official after another each demands louder bells, which cause increasingly more mayhem. … Finally, Ms. Sabio, who was rudely interrupted by the mayor when she tried to explain why Henry stayed put, saves the day with a simple solution. A zany, rollicking story with hilarious illustrations.

I’m glad to see that the reviewer loves Ashley Spires‘ art in Book or Bell? as much as I do, and the same goes for Victo Ngai‘s illustrations in Dazzle Ships.

From the Kirkus review of Dazzle Ships:

Ngai uses analog and digital media to great effect, from the dazzling cover (which will attract many readers all by itself) to the range of designs employed, applying an appropriate period aesthetic throughout. [I]t’s a fascinating volume about a little-known side of the war. An eye-catching title sure to dazzle.

Dazzle Ships will be published by Lerner Publishing/Millbrook Press September 1, and Book or Bell? is due out from Bloomsbury on October 17.

19 Apr

Bibliography for Dazzle Ships

The back matter for Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion includes a two-page timeline with archival photographs, my author’s note, Victo Ngai’s illustrator’s note, and suggestions for further reading.

With all this material that Millbrook Press did include in those final pages, there wasn’t room for a bibliography of the sources I found most helpful in writing the text for the book.

So, I’m presenting them here, and the book includes the URL for the Dazzle Ships page on my website, which in turn links to this post.

Anderson, Ross. Abbott Handerson Thayer. Syracuse, New York: Everson Museum, 1982.

Ball, Philip. Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen. New York: Random House, 2014.

Behrens, Roy R. Camoupedia: A Compendium of Research on Art, Architecture and Camouflage. Dysart, Iowa: Bobolink Books, 2009.

Behrens, Roy R. Camoupedia (blog). Available at http://camoupedia.blogspot.com. Accessed March 21, 2017.

Behrens, Roy R. False Colors: Art, Design and Modern Camouflage. Dysart, Iowa: Bobolink Books, 2002.

Black, Jonathan. “‘A few broad stripes’: Perception, deception and the ‘Dazzle Ship’ phenomenon of the First World War,” in Contested Objects: Material Memories of the Great War, edited by Nicholas J. Saunders and Paul Cornish. New York: Routledge, 2009.

Blechman, Hardy. Disruptive Pattern Material: An Encyclopedia of Camouflage. Richmond Hill, Ontario: Firefly Books, 2004.

Edwards, Paul, editor. Blast: Vorticism 1914-1918. Burlington, Vermont: Ashgate, 2000.

“First World War dazzle ships.” Merseyside Maritime Museum. Available at http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/archive/displays/dazzle-ships/index.aspx. Accessed March 21, 2017.

Forbes, Peter. Dazzled and Deceived: Mimicry and Camouflage. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 2009.

Friedman, Norman. Naval Weapons of World War One. Barnsley, South Yorkshire: Seaforth Publishing, 2011.

Goodwin, Paul. “Dazzle Ships.” Mystic Seaport. Available at http://educators.mysticseaport.org/artifacts/dazzle_ships/. Accessed March 21, 2017.

Gordon, Jan. “The Art of Dazzle Painting,” Land & Water, December 12, 1918.

Hartcup, Guy. Camouflage: A History of Concealment and Deception in War. New York: Scribner’s, 1980.

Hurd, Archibald. The Merchant Navy, Vol. III. London: John Murray, 1929.

Hurst, Hugh. “Dazzle Painting in War-Time.” The International Studio, Volume 68, 1919.

Kaempffert, Waldemar. “Fighting the U-Boat with Paint,” Popular Science Monthly, April 1919.

Massie, Robert K. Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea. New York: Random House, 2003.

McRobbie, Linda Rodriguez. “When the British Wanted to Camouflage Their Warships, They Made Them Dazzle.” Smithsonian.com, April 7, 2016. Available at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/when-british-wanted-camouflage-their-warships-they-made-them-dazzle-180958657/. Accessed March 21, 2017.

Murphy, Hugh, and Martin Bellamy. “The Dazzling Zoologist: John Graham Kerr and the Early Development of Ship Camouflage.” The Northern Mariner, Volume 19, April 2009.

Naval Investigation: Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Naval Affairs, United States Senate, Sixty-Sixth Congress, Second Session. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1921.

Overy, Paul. “Vorticism,” in Concepts of Modern Art: From Fauvism to Postmodernism, edited by Nikos Stangos. London: Thames and Hudson, 1994.

“Patterns in Practice: The Art of Conflict” (interview with James Taylor of the Imperial War Museum). Patternity, October 3, 2014. Available at http://explore.patternity.org/news/patterns-in-practice-the-art-of-war/. Accessed March 21, 2017.

Rankin, Nicholas. A Genius for Deception: How Cunning Helped the British Win Two World Wars. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

Raven, Alan. “The Development of Naval Camouflage.” USN Camouflage 1941-1945. Available at http://www.shipcamouflage.com/development_of_naval_camouflage.htm. Accessed March 21, 2017.

“Razzle Dazzle.” 99% Invisible, October 5, 2012. Available at http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/episode-65-razzle-dazzle/. Accessed March 21, 2017.

Rose, Kenneth. King George V. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984.

Wilkinson, Norman. A Brush with Life. London: Seeley Service & Co Ltd., 1969

Wilkinson, Norman. The Encyclopaedia Britannica, 12th ed., vol XXX, “Camouflage: Naval Camouflage.” London: The Encyclopaedia Britannica Company, Ltd., 1922

Williams, David L. Naval Camouflage 1914-1945: A Complete Visual Reference. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 2001.

Wilson, David A. H. “Avian Anti-Submarine Warfare Proposals in Britain, 1915-18: The Admiralty and Thomas Mills,” International Journal of Naval History, April 2006.

13 Apr

Revealing the dazzling cover of my next book!

This tiny little image of Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion is all I’ll show you here today, but if you’ll hop on over to A Fuse #8 Production, you’ll see librarian Betsy Bird’s post providing a first, up-close look at debut illustrator Victo Ngai’s stunning artwork for our book due out from Lerner/Millbrook Press this September.

Texas librarians, you can see more of Dazzle Ships next week at the Texas Library Association conference in San Antonio. A lot more — as in, hot-off-the-press copies of the entire book, which I’ll be signing in the Author Area at 10:15 next Thursday morning.

20 Mar

The Nutcracker Comes to America is a Texas Institute of Letters finalist

So many friends to root for!

That was my first reaction upon seeing this year’s finalists in the various children’s literature categories of the Texas Institute of Letters awards.

I’m honored that my The Nutcracker Comes to America, illustrated by Cathy Gendron, is in the running for the Denton Record-Chronicle Award for Best Children’s Picture Book.

Nutcracker_frontcover

But regardless of the outcome next month, isn’t this some great company to be in?

H-E-B/Jean Flynn Award for Best Children’s Book ($500)
Liz Garton Scanlon, The Great Good Summer (Beach Lane Books); Anne Bustard, Anywhere But Paradise (EgmontUSA); Don Tate, Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton (Peachtree Publishers)

H-E-B Best Young Adults Book ($500)
David Bowles, The Smoking Mirror (IFWG Publishing), Brian Yansky, Utopia, Iowa (Candlewick); Rene S. Perez II, Seeing Off the Johns (Cinco Puntos Press)

Denton Record-Chronicle Award for Best Children’s Picture Book ($500)
Pat Mora, The Remembering Day / El dia de los muertos (Arte Público Press); Kathi Appelt, Counting Crows (Atheneum Books for Young Readers); Chris Barton, The Nutcracker Comes to America (Millbrook Press)

Congratulations to all the finalists in all the categories, and especially to Sarah Bird for her career-honoring Lon Tinkle Award. Talk about great company

16 Sep

A 2nd starred review (from Booklist) for the Christensen brothers!

Christensens at barre

Things are shaping up nicely for Willam, Harold, and Lew Christensen, the subjects of my new book with Cathy Gendron, ‘The Nutcracker’ Comes to America: How Three Ballet-Loving Brothers Created a Holiday Tradition (Millbook Press).

Here’s some of what ALA Booklist had to say in the starred review that it published this week:

Barton offers a lively, colorful text and follows up with a very informative time line, illustrated with period photos, in the back matter. In her picture-book debut, Gendron turns in a virtuoso performance. Her handsome illustrations capture the distinctive posture and poise of ballet dancers, while portraying even minor characters as individuals. Suffused with light and warmth, the varied, imaginative paintings include dynamic textured effects as well as an inventively used ribbon to tie pages together. Even readers familiar with The Nutcracker will probably learn a good deal from this engaging picture book. Bravo! Brava!

14 Sep

A star for Nutcracker from Publishers Weekly!

Nutcracker_jacket

I couldn’t be happier with this starred review from Publishers Weekly for ‘The Nutcracker’ Comes to America: How Three Ballet-Loving Brothers Created a Holiday Tradition.

Here’s an excerpt:

Balancing evocative turns of phrase with a crisp, forthright narrative, Barton delivers an involving account of how watching The Nutcracker ballet, which originated in Russia, became an American holiday tradition. … [A] fascinating bit of artistic investigation, one with year-round appeal.

Read the whole thing for the apt praise for illustrator Cathy Gendron’s work. Congratulations and thank you to her and the team at Lerner Publishing/Millbrook Press!

09 Sep

“Music, dance, a holiday tradition”

Thank you, Teresa Rolfe Kravtin, for this appreciation of ‘The Nutcracker’ Comes to America: How Three Ballet-Loving Brothers Created a Holiday Tradition. It cites a book I adore, but whose connection to my own I had never considered:

Every year, The Nutcracker is staged in communities across America, and with this book, author Chris Barton tells the history behind how it came to be. More than just that, the story unfolds and explores how three brothers made their way through life pursuing their passion of dance, and creatively found ways of making money and becoming entertainers. In some ways, this reminds me of Melissa Sweet’s Balloons Over Broadway, another tale of a creative artist, Tony Sarg, a puppeteer who made something no one had quite ever made before, upside-down helium balloon puppets for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, and it became a part of our national holiday tradition.

Nutcracker_frontcover